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Wednesday, June 03, 2015

Great Moments in Black Oral History: Affirmative Action Medal of Honor Campaign Accidentally Unearths Truth About a Black Woman Who Lied to Her Son, and Told Him Black WWI Hero was His Father; Undeterred, Fake Granddaughter Declares, “He's Always Going to be My Grandfather”

 

“This undated photo provided by the U.S. Army shows Army Pvt. Henry Johnson. Pvt. Johnson was one of two World War I Army heroes on Tuesday June 2, 2015, who finally received the Medal of Honor they may have been denied because of discrimination, nearly 100 years after bravely rescuing comrades on the battlefields of France. (U.S. Army via AP)”
 

“In this June 2, 2015 photo, Tara Johnson, poses in the East Room of the White House in Washington before the Medal of Honor ceremony for the late Army Pvt. Henry Johnson. Two days before President Barack Obama announced a posthumous Medal of Honor for black World War I soldier Henry Johnson, a family got staggering news about the legacy of heroism that had inspired them for generations. A U.S. Army general visited Tara Johnson last month with word Johnson was not her grandfather, World War II Tuskegee airman Herman Johnson was not the hero’s son. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)”
 

“Tara Johnson, left, talks with Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, before the Medal of Honor ceremony for the late Army Pvt. Henry Johnson. Pvt. Johnson was one of two World War I Army heroes — one black, one Jewish —that finally received the Medal of Honor they may have been [?!] denied because of discrimination, nearly 100 years after bravely rescuing comrades on the battlefields of France. Tara Johnson learned only two days before the recent announcement of new honorees that the military determined she is not the granddaughter of WWI hero Henry Johnson. That after decades of campaigning to get him honored. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)”
 

WWI Army Sgt. William Shemin: Unlike the previous photographs, this one was not displayed in the AP story below, whose author and/or editors refused to so much as mention Sgt. Shemin
 

Re-posted by Nicholas Stix

[Postscript, January 7, 2016, 2:02 p.m.: Upon re-reading this story, I am convinced that Henry Johnson deserved neither the Medal of Honor, nor the Distinguished Service Cross, and only received them via affirmative action. He saved one comrade. It would be a different story, had he saved a few or several comrades, but white soldiers saved single comrades all the time, without getting any medals. White soldiers were and are expected to be courageous. But when a black man goes into harm’s way, all of a sudden, his every accomplishment is exaggerated, just as any of his offenses, up to and including rape and murder, are diminished and excused.]

I thank the reader who sent me this story.

It’s Sally Hemings, all over again!

Fraudulent “oral historians” of black America, typically black, love “oral history,” because it is not held to any scholarly standards. Its only purpose is to elevate blacks, while denigrating whites, especially great whites. Thus, the fact that an oral history claim not only has no factual basis, but can be objectively proven to be fraudulent, is of no concern to the black supremacist “scholars,” politicians, and fraudulent “family” members profiting off of it. Thus, a black family continues to profit off of the cottage industry it founded by lying, in claiming to be descended from Thomas Jefferson, long after being exposed as hustlers.

The quintessential case of such a fraud is the ongoing Sally Hemings Hoax, which I debunked in an exposé that Middle American News’ Jerry Woodruff commissioned, and then published in 2003.

Various blacks had been lying to their children for centuries, telling them that they were the descendants of Thomas Jefferson, via a fictional long-term relationship between the Sage of Monticello and slave girl Sally Hemings, which produced either six or seven offspring (the hoaxers can’t keep their lies straight).

Interestingly, the hoax was set into motion in 1802 by a white man, blackmailer James Thomson Callender, who posed as a journalist. Well, maybe not so interesting, considering the tradition of white ghostwriters for black scoundrels: Stanley Levison for Martin Luther King Jr.; Alan Bean and Howard Witt for the Jena Hoax; Bill Ayers for the John Doe calling himself “Barack Obama,” et al.

Callender, who had been imprisoned in 1798 by President John Adams under the Alien and Sedition Acts, was rescued by the new Congress (part of Jefferson’s 1800 victory), which repealed the Acts in 1802. Callender expressed his gratitude by seeking to extort the job of Postmaster General of Richmond, Virginia, out of the new President. When Jefferson refused to pay up, Callender unleashed the most enduring race hoax in American history on the world.

Recent years have seen not only the revival and institutionalization of the Sally Hemings Hoax, but a huge hoax industry which dominates the racial socialist antiversity and media.

I’ve written enough about today’s hoax culture to fill books on the matter, while barely scratching the surface. Where the article below is concerned, it is part of a movement to glorify obscure black servicemen from long ago, vilify white military leaders who can no longer defend themselves, and to rescue and cast as victims black monsters.

Henry Johnson was apparently a legitimate war hero, but the decision to grant him the Medal of Honor almost 100 years after his heroic deeds, in tandem with a Jewish soldier, William Shemin, whom AP “reporter” George M. Walsh refused to even name, leaves no doubt as to the purely political motivation of the decision. These were affirmative action MOHs, and a joint venture of black and Jewish political elites.

On the other side of the ledger, under the new dispensation, black military monsters like Louis Till, a serial rapist and murderer to whom justice was meted out in Italy in 1945 by a military hanging, are cast as victims.

Pseudo-scholars’ strategy of presenting black devils like Louis Till as victims of “Jim Crow,” as companion pieces to the canonization of Till’s son, Emmett, may work on those too ignorant or cowed to respond properly, but what they do to me is to make me ever more suspicious of the official Emmett Till story, which is controlled by the same league of frauds.
 

With Medal of Honor award, family learns WWI hero wasn't kin
By George M. Walsh https://twitter.com/gmwalshap @gmwalshAP
June 3rd 2015 5:15 A.M.
The Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) -- Two days before President Barack Obama announced a posthumous Medal of Honor for black World War I soldier Henry Johnson, a family got staggering news about the legacy of heroism that had inspired them for generations and through three wars. They weren't related to Johnson by blood after all.

An Army general visited Tara Johnson last month with word that Henry Johnson was not her grandfather, and that her father, World War II Tuskegee airman Herman Johnson, was not the hero's son.

"Dad's birth certificate didn't have Henry on it," she told The Associated Press in an interview this week. The name of the man listed on the document found by Pentagon researchers vetting Johnson's lineage was one relatives had never heard mentioned as the father.

"All we have ever known is Henry Lincoln Johnson," she said. "My family is going through an identity crisis; this shocked our foundation."

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Army shows Army Pvt. Henry Johnson. Pvt. Johnson was one of two World War I Army heroes on Tuesday June 2, 2015, who finally received the Medal of Honor they may have been denied because of discrimination, nearly 100 years after bravely rescuing comrades on the battlefields of France. (U.S. Army via AP)

She said they're at a loss to explain what had been a given for so long. Her father spoke warmly of Henry Johnson, recalling his sense of humor and trips to the park as a boy before the life of the man he knew as his father began to fall apart and the family broke up.

Henry Johnson was a railroad porter in Albany before the war. He enlisted in the Army and won acclaim for rescuing a comrade despite suffering grenade and gunshot wounds in a ferocious hand-to-hand battle with German raiders in 1918. Returning from France, he was honored with parades and glowing newspaper stories about his exploits with the 369th Infantry Regiment, a unit known as the "Harlem Hellfighters."

But while France awarded him the Croix de Guerre for heroism, Johnson was given no medals by a U.S. military mired in Jim Crow-era racism.

Hobbled by his wartime injuries and unable to work, Johnson took to drinking. He died destitute in 1929 at age 32 at an Illinois veterans hospital.

Johnson's memory was revived in the 1970s by Albany-area veterans and public officials who believed he had been unfairly denied the honors he deserved, and they worked for decades, joined by Herman Johnson's family, to right that wrong.

On Tuesday, the president handed the Medal of Honor to New York National Guard Command Sgt. Maj. Louis Wilson because the military found no known blood relatives of Johnson.

Tara Johnson had expected for months to be in that soldier's place once it became clear the uphill fight for the honor was won. Still, she was at the ceremony along with her cousin, a Vietnam veteran also named Herman Johnson. Her son, DeMarqus Townsend, a Marine who fought insurgents in the Iraqi city of Fallujah, couldn't make it. Johnson said she was glad for the invitation to the White House and happy to be with the people from Albany who made the day possible.

"The highlight for me was hearing the commander in chief telling Henry Johnson's battle story. It was breathtaking," she said after the ceremony.

"Tara's been great," said Sen. Charles Schumer, whose staff uncovered documents in 2011 that provided the final evidence that Johnson deserved the medal.

He credited Herman Johnson and his family with helping keep the medal campaign alive and thought it was right they should be represented at the White House.

Herman Johnson traveled from his Kansas City, Missouri, home for events in Albany and lived long enough to join then-Gov. George Pataki and others for an Arlington National Cemetery ceremony marking a belated award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the second highest medal for bravery, to Henry Johnson in 2002.

After Herman Johnson's death in 2004 at age 87, his daughter — also from Kansas City — took on a greater role.

"This has been a long journey, ever since I was a kid," said Tara Johnson, now 56.

Morena Walker-Howe's late husband, Vietnam veteran John Howe, is widely credited with energizing the effort in Albany to recognize the hometown hero.

She said her husband was so confident in the campaign for the Medal of Honor that he told designers of one new Johnson monument in the city to leave an empty spot on the stone to add it later.

"Tara and I had bonded through this experience," Walker-Howe said, and she remembers Tara visiting to talk to students at a charter school named for Henry Johnson.

She said she, too, was bewildered, "to find this out after all these years."

Jack McEneny, a former Albany County historian and state assemblyman, was involved in efforts as early as 1972 to restore the memory of Johnson. He believes Herman Johnson's mother, for whatever reason, held out Henry Johnson as the father, deciding, perhaps, "I'm going to give my child a role model."

He said he thinks Henry Johnson had a "great influence" on Herman, who was born in Schenectady.

"There's no question in my mind he went to his grave believing Henry Johnson was his father," McEneny said.

On Tuesday, Tara Johnson put a wreath on Henry Johnson's grave, which was rediscovered in Arlington National Cemetery in 2002.

"He's always going to be my grandfather," she said.

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