PayPal

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

D.A. King on Georgia Bill Requiring Information Sharing on Illegal Alien Felons Released Back on America’s Streets

Via “W”

Georgia Legislature Passes Simple but Important Public Safety Criminal Alien Info-Sharing Bill – HB 452
By D.A. King
Dustin Inman Society

Before it concluded on March 30, the Georgia General Assembly passed HB 452, which requires the state’s highest law enforcement agency, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) to share information all states are receiving concerning convicted, criminal aliens who have been released onto American streets because of unsuccessful deportation attempts. The most common reason for non-deportation is that the home nation refuses to accept the criminal aliens back when the U.S. orders him deported.

Because of the immense public pressure – including in the national media - applied for passage (here and here and here ) of the original one-page version of HB 452, the state senate added language of another mostly unrelated bill that had been rejected by the House when it became clear that HB 452 was gong to see final passage.

We link to the pertinent language of HB 452 here.

It should be noted that in 2015 the feds released almost 20,000 criminal aliens who should have been deported. HB 452 will now lead to expansion of info sharing on illegal aliens who are in Georgia jails and to point out to legislators that they are allowing these same individuals to obtain Georgia drivers licenses.

These convicted criminal victims of borders had a total of 64,197 convictions among them. These included 8,234 violent convictions and 208 homicide convictions. HB 452 was conceived and written to require GBI to share the information it has been getting from the feds for the last eighteen months with all of Georgia’s county sheriffs and to post the criminal aliens’ personal info on a public website. This data comes to every state through a federal notification system known as EID/LENS.

Model legislation
Pro-enforcement activists in other states who see the deterrent and public safety value in allowing local law enforcement and the general public to be forewarned about the release of criminal aliens into their communities should use the language of HB 452 as a model. They should also be aware of the corporate-funded open borders lobby’s endless attempts to dilute or kill legislation like this with baseless howls of “anti-immigrant” and “civil rights” and “privacy rights” violations. Also that HB 452 is “bad for business.”

Be advised: The U.S Privacy Act does not apply to illegal aliens.

Below:
Legal Match Law blog
for example:

“While the Privacy Act doesn’t require the inclusion of people other than U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents, since 2007 it has been the policy of the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies to extend its protections more broadly and include non-citizens. In 2014, a policy directive signed by President Obama also imposed limits on the ability of U.S. agencies to use intelligence collected in bulk “whatever their nationality and regardless of where they may reside.” Trump’s order rolls back the clock on these changes–and governments abroad have taken notice.”

Here in Georgia, the liberal AJC newspaper also tried to kill the bill with fake news reporting on its contents.

HB 452 passed the House Public Safety and Homeland Security Committee with a bipartisan unanimous vote, but ran into trouble in the GOP controlled senate because of an anti-enforcement Republican committee Chair and race-baiting Democrat assertions that the bill is “unconstitutional.”

HB 452 awaits signature by Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has 40 days after the final day of session to sign or veto. He can also do nothing, which allows the bill to become law.

We worked on HB 452 language and research for nearly two years.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

"the feds released almost 20,000 criminal aliens who should have been deported. HB 452 will now lead to expansion of info sharing on illegal aliens who are in Georgia jails and to point out to legislators that they are allowing these same individuals to obtain Georgia drivers licenses."

The Federal prison system keeps good records on the number of illegals in the system. Is about 15 %. The states do not keep such good records. I would venture that percentage is about as high in the state prisons and county jails.