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Friday, November 04, 2016

For Over 30 Years, Blacks Have been Working to Make Attending Baseball Games as Dangerous as They’ve Made Going to the Movies

Excerpted by Nicholas Stix

Thanks to reader-researcher LJ.

Steve Sailer writes:

“Baseball is kind of an Implicit White Identity pastime. In particular, Chicago Cubs fandom is a sort of white middle class marker: in the 1980s when most baseball teams didn’t want to be on TV for fear of hurting in-person attendance, the Cubs were owned by the Tribune Company, which pumped out 81 Cubs home games per year over cable TV superstation WGN. (The other team with a similar strategy was Ted Turner’s Atlanta Braves.)

“This wound up making the friendly confines of Wrigley Field on the yuppie North Side into a national shrine of urbanism.

“Personally, I lived within walking distance of Wrigley Field for 18 years. I always thought that the old Comiskey Park that the White Sox played in on the South Side was cooler looking than Wrigley, which is rather functionalist. On the other hand, the first time I went to a White Sox game on a company outing in 1983, as we were getting off the El at S. 35th St., a local welfare grandmother violently shoved our executive vice-president because he was trying to get off the train when she wanted to get on it.

“So, Comiskey’s neighborhood was a little harder to deal with than Wrigley’s….”

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"the first time I went to a White Sox game on a company outing in 1983, as we were getting off the El at S. 35th St., a local welfare grandmother violently shoved our executive vice-president because he was trying to get off the train when she wanted to get on it."

That 35th st. El station was on State st. and you have to walk about two blocks to get to the ball park. Right by Robert Taylor Homes. A very dangerous spot.

Anonymous said...

“This wound up making the friendly confines of Wrigley Field on the yuppie North Side into a national shrine of urbanism."


that Wrigleyville area was sixty years ago rather seedy but has beoome gentrified and over the years nearly is now upper class.

al L.